The only thing you have to FEAR IS...

The only thing you have to FEAR IS...

Everyone has heard the claim that individuals fear public speaking more than death, and while this declaration seems a bit far-fetched, surveys support the idea.[1]

Scientifically, fear of public speaking is called glossophobia (glōssa meaning tongue) and it affects upward of 74% of Americans.[2]

So whether public speaking is truly on par with death or not, the reality is that anxiety prevents millions of people from capitalizing on the power of public speaking…

To Memorize or Not to Memorize...

To Memorize or Not to Memorize...

In public speaking circles a battle is raging that rivals the Yankees vs the Red Sox, the Hatfields vs the McCoys, and the Patriots vs the world.

It’s between the anti-memorizers ...and the practice-makes-perfect people.  Polar opposite strategies, so who’s right?

Rule 12/24

Rule 12/24

293 words.

The slide shown below, used during the keynote address at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, consists of 293 words.

...

At their core, effective slides must augment the presenter’s message, not introduce a distraction.  

Beginnings

Beginnings

The New Year is a time of optimism. Of anticipation. Of hope.  And the New Year contains this wellspring of expectation because it marks the beginning.  The beginning of something unknown.

The very first moments of a speech share much with the New Year, and like the turning of the calendar, the first thing an audience experiences sets an all-important tone.

The Roadmap

The Roadmap

“TURN!”

I grew up before the advent of GPS, and I keenly remember my passenger’s side-seat navigation.  If we were lucky, it involved last-second commands to take a turn or change lanes.  On many occasions, however, the command came seconds too late and we were forced to make hasty u-turns, back-track, or otherwise bumble our way to the destination.  

And while GPS gave us a digital roadmap to solve this problem in our cars, many speeches and presentations still suffer from unannounced and abrupt twists and turns that leave the audience dizzy with intellectual whiplash.

Ready for the 5-Minute Meeting?

Ready for the 5-Minute Meeting?

Providing co-workers critical updates and sharing novel ideas is essential to an integrated, vibrant, and productive team.  It was in the spirit of this collaboration and a testament to the “two-heads-are-better-than-one” mentality that regular intra-office meetings were born.  But with a trend toward open-office concepts with tightly regulated meeting spaces, increases in off-site employees, and a greater premium placed on efficiency, the regularly occurring 1-hour meeting is no longer a viable calendar event.[1]

Break Free From "The Box"

Break Free From "The Box"

Last night, a steady stream of ghouls, zombies, and werewolves crawled the streets, making wild gestures to add to the believability of their characters.  Speakers looking to command similar attention and engagement from their audience must also pay attention to their hands and arms when presenting. 
This action is known as gesturing, and it is more important than you think. 

Send YOUR Signal

Send YOUR Signal

Whether firefly or public speaker, providing your audience with an authentic indicator of who you are is essential to your success.  Audiences are looking for signals of authenticity, and when they are missing, their internal alarms are quick to signal an imposter.